Important Dates

Mar 15
Deadline for abstract submissions
Mar 30
Communication of accepted abstracts
Apr 10
Early registration for conference ends
May 27
Networks in Food Systems and Nutrition Satellite

About

Major advances in data science, nutrition, and health behavior have enabled novel networked frameworks across multiple levels that can inform personalized health recommendations, community interventions, and population level policies. Sensors and other digital tracking technologies are now able to record individual eating patterns with great detail, as well as to link eating to important locational, temporal, and social factors. At the same time, efforts in large scale computing and artificial intelligence have led to food ingredient databases that provide rich detail on food contents at the chemical level, and to food trade databases that help to map food production and supply infrastructure. New approaches that integrate these advances across scales, based in network science and big data, are beginning to uncover new insights about the relationship between specific food chemicals with consumption behaviors, linking this to health and disease outcomes. This satellite symposium aims to bring together a diverse group of researchers in this exciting new research space for the first time at NetSci 2019, including experts from food science, biochemistry, bioinformatics, nutritional epidemiology, and population health science; established investigators in network science applied to food systems, nutrition, and medicine; and budding researchers. Talks and discussion will explore topics and challenges within major themes:

Network Medicine

Mapping food compounds and linking them to health; epidemiological studies

Food Science, Technology, & Health Implications

Plant biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and computation

Population health networks and tracking technologies

Physiological & psychological factors that drive food choices and technologies that link consumption to health

Food Supply Networks & Food Environment

Processes related to growing, manufacturing, and distributing food; infrastructure that affects access to and consumption of food

Objectives and Format

The objective of this satellite is to bring together a community of researchers interested in exploring new insights and collaborations that come from integrating current methodologies and findings across these food and health system themes, and the impact and translation of this knowledge. Presentations and sessions will catalyze discussion on complex topics related to food-nutrition-health networks and systems, aiming towards following goals: (1) to better understand the current state of the field from different disciplinary perspectives; (2) to identify intersections and interdependencies across systems that impact human health; and (3) to formalize areas of future research that have potential to make major scientific advances in our knowledge and have potential to result in significant improvement in health outcomes. This will be facilitated through a format including presentations from invited speakers and tracks of contributed talks within each of the 4 themes, with time for discussion on open problems and future collaborations.

Schedule

8:00-8:15 am Welcome & Introduction
8:15-9:30 am Network Medicine: Mapping food compounds and linking them to health; epidemiological studies
Keynote (30 min)
Invited Speaker (20 min)
Contributed Speaker (15 min)
2 Flash Talks (10 min)
9:30-10:45 am Food science, technology, and health implications: Plant biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and computation
Keynote (30 min)
Invited Speaker (20 min)
Contributed Speaker (15 min)
Flash Talks (10 min)
10:45-11:15 am Coffee Break
11:15 am-12:30 pm Population health networks and tracking technologies: Physiological/psychological factors that drive food choices and technologies that link consumption to health
Keynote (30 min)
Invited Speaker (20 min)
Contributed Speaker (15 min)
Flash Talks (10 min)
12:30-1:45 pm Food supply networks and food environment: Processes related to growing, manufacturing, and distributing food; infrastructure that affects access to and consumption of food
Keynote (30 min)
Invited Speaker (20 min)
Contributed Speaker (15 min)
Flash Talks (10 min)
1:45-2:00 pm Discussion + Future Collaborations

Contributors

Speakers

TBA

Organizers

Abigail Horn

Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

Abigail Horn is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Applied Network Analysis at the at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. Her work focuses on modeling network structure and transmission dynamics and integrating emerging information sources to solve problems relating to preventing infectious and chronic diseases. Abigail recently led a research project at the German federal-level food protection agency to develop, implement, and evaluate algorithms and decision support systems for modeling food supply networks to identify the source of large-scale outbreaks of foodborne disease. Her current work involves integrating digital trace data to quantify the impact of mobility on food consumer behavior, nutrition, and health.

Giulia Menichetti

Network Science Institute, Northeastern University

Giulia Menichetti is an Associate Research Scientist at the Network Science Institute (Barabasi Lab, Northeastern University). She is a physicist, with a background in network modeling of biological information. She currently leads the Foodome project that aims to track the full chemical complexity of the food we consume and develop quantitative tools to unveil, at the mechanistic level, the impact of these chemicals on our health.